• Green brand of the week: Columbia

    Making sustainability the core of your brand’s identity requires a lot of energy, creative resources and devotion to the cause. The sportswear label Columbia understands this pretty well and shows exactly how the sustainable cycle works, involving the key elements: care for the people and the environment.

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    Empowering people

    Columbia supports and inspires its employees to be active citizens and to be more responsible in their life choices. Every Columbia employee gets paid for 16 volunteer hours per year. The brand has also founded HERproject, which aims to empower the women in the company’s workforce through trainings and enrichment programs.

    Sustaining places

    The outdoor label is partnering with the National Park Foundation to help kids discover the natural wonders of our world. For each purchased National Park T-shirt, Columbia donates $1 to the Open OutDoors for Kids initiative. The brand also supports the U.S. nonprofit organisationPlanet Water Foundation in providing clean water for people from the world’s most disadvantaged communities.

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    Responsible practices

    Columbia follows the 12 ethical Standards of manufacturing practices (SMP) and monitors performance for the continuous improvement of the working environment. The brand is striving to make products with fewer chemicals which are safe for everyone who comes into contact with them, from the people in the manufacturing process to those who wear them.

    Responsible down standard

    The brand works under the independent, voluntary global standard The Responsible Down Standard, which recognises the best practices in animal welfare and ensures the down and feathers used in the production of all Columbia products are sourced responsibly.

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    OutDry Extreme Eco

    OutDry Extreme Eco is a sustainable, waterproof, breathable technology for jackets. It combines high performance and ecological materials. The jackets are made with dye-free fabric, 100% recycled materials, 100% responsible down and with strong thermal bonding, which ensures the cold stays out of the body and the down stays inside the jacket.

    And these practices are just a few good examples of how the brand keeps up with sustainability.

  • Green brand of the week: Aquafil

    You know that during the past few years, the art of Green Fashion has been so popular that we can actually call it a trend.

    As we are getting closer and closer to summer, we decided to show you that it is absolutely possible to have the perfect swimsuit… made from garbage.

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    “When I look at a landfill, I see a goldmine.”
    That is how Giuio Bonazzi, the founder and chief executive of nylon manufacturer Aquafil – the green brand that we are presenting today –feels about creating recycled materials.

    The company recycles plastic waste and turns it into nylon used for the production of apparel and accessories. It all started in 1969 with “Polyamide 6”/”Nylon 6” – a landmark in terms of quality and innovation. All the yarns manufactured by Aquafil are environmentally friendly. The Econyl thread is made from all kind of recycled materials (an interesting example of those are fishing nets and old carpets). If it is not mixed with other materials, the thread can be recycled infinitely!

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    Aquafil works closely with some of the leading names in swimwear and sportswear. Actually, you may already have a swimsuit made from recycled materials – Adidas, Levi’s, Speedo and Volcom are just some of the brands using the yarn for their collections.

    Here is a list with some of the other green brands in our Green Fashion section:

    RefuSHE
    TOMS
    MATT & NAT

  • The first Vegan Fashion Week

    After becoming the first city to officially ban the sale and manufacture of fur, Los Angeles continued its strive toward green fashion and became a host of the first-ever Vegan Fashion Week. The show focused on conscious brands like Stella McCartney, Mateja Benedetti, Enda, Mistohn, wastedLAand Ecopel, inspiring others with high-end ethical fashion with respect for the people, involved in the production processes, animal rights and the environment.

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    Even though a fashion week evolving veganism may sound a little judgmental, Vegan Fashion Week is an important and logical step into popularizing ethical fashion globally. The main focus of the event is to be good to all creatures on the planet. The fashion week went under the motto “Cruelty-free is the new luxury”, aiming to give animal-loving high-end designers the opportunity to presenttheir products on the catwalk.

    The show took place at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles for 4 days – from 1st until 4THFebruary, 2019 – and was organized and curated by the creative director and animal rights advocate Emmanuelle Rienda. During the four-day event educational information about animal and human rights in the fashion business was circulated. There were also discussions about the environmental crisis and the consequences of fast fashion.

    Besides designers and guests, the museum opened its doors to climate scientist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Robert Lempert, who talked about “Facing our time” or what are the challenges we face around ecological and climate change through the lenses of science and nature.

    By creating Vegan Fashion Week, Emmanuelle Rienda showed that it’s possible to run a successful business and be an active, creative and conscious citizen of the world, at the same time.

  • Green brand of the week: Patagonia

    With a deep understanding of how important it is to become and remain sustainable in the fashion industry today, the outdoor apparel brand Patagonia is making a big effort and is constantly searching for ways to improve its own business practices for the sake of a healthier environment.

    Patagonia has grown from a small company for climbers’ tools to the well-known brand it is nowadays, while alpinism still remains the main focus – they still make clothes for climbing, as well as for other so-called “silent” sports that don’t require a motor (skiing, snowboarding, surfing, paddling and running).

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    In 1996, the company went green in its business processes and it’s still revealing its potential in the sustainable fashion field.

    This is how the brand has been dealing with environmental issues for over 30 years:

    – The Earth Tax: Patagonia is famous for giving over 1% of its total revenue (or 10% of the profit) to environmental organisations. They believe this is the minimum the company can do for our planet in return for using its resources.

    – Renewable energy: the company switched to alternative energy sources with near 500 solar panels

    – atural fibers: hemp, organic cotton, Tencellyocell, Yulex

    – Recycled fibers:  plastic bottles and old clothes are recycled in order to produce new fashion garments

    – Green Buildings: Patagonia upgraded its 7 business buildings to improve the efficient use of energy, water, and materials, and also to reduce the impact on human health and the environment for the entire lifecycle of the buildings.

    – Using the company’s voice to advocate for systemic change and to fight for a healthier environment

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    – Supporting regenerative practices in ranching and agriculture, which increases biodiversity, enriches soils, improves watersheds, and enhances ecosystem services

    – Creating Drive-Less program which provides a monetary incentive for employees who ride a bike/ skateboard, take public transportation or carpool (anything but drive alone) to work.

    – Paper Policy: the company is using a big amount of paper, so it’s trying to use 100% recycled paper or at least paper that contains virgin fibers from non-endangered forests.

    Basically, all Patagonia does is out of love and care for the environment. That’s how the company has become a leader in the green fashion industry – by setting a good example for other fashion companies to follow.

  • Green brand of the week: RefuSHE

    As you probably already know, during the past few years the art of Green Fashion has been so popular that we can actually call it a trend.

    Let’s journey back to the Spring-Summer 2016 collection that Karl Lagerfeld designed for Chanel. The sustainable pieces were created from jute, hemp, cork, cotton, straw and even recycled paper.

    And how about Stella McCartney, the designer who banned fur, suede, leather and feathers in her collection since the establishment of her eponymous brand?

    Some less popular brands are dedicated to sustainable lifestyle; others have special lines that embrace the idea. This week, we focus on RefuSHE.

    “We created RefuSHE to be a model for protection, empowerment, and peace-building in Kenya and beyond.”
    – Anne Sweeney, RefuSHE Co-founder

    Anne and Taylin Good, the two co-founders of RefuSHE, have been working with refugee communities in Africa for a long time. During that period, they realized that the most vulnerable refugees are the girls and women who are orphans. Here is why they launched Heshima Kenya, now known as RefuSHE – a community for young refugee women where they live together and learn how to defend their rights.

    Every woman deserves opportunities – that is the main principle behind RefuSHE. The organization provides education and safe houses and helps the girls develop skills that can guarantee their economic independence after wars and other political conflicts. They learn special techniques, such as how to paint and dye fabrics, and the results can be found here – a bold and bright collection of scarves, accessories and clothing.

    The profit from every purchased item is reinvested in RefuSHE programs for other girls and young women who need help.

    “It was my kind of runway: the most beautiful girls, survivors with their heads held high, bringing forward their own designs and culture.”
    – Angelina Jolie for the RefuSHE’s debut runway show

    Are you choosing your scarf at the moment?

  • Green brand of the week: 4Ocean

    As you probably already know, during the past few years the art of Green Fashion has been so popular that we can actually call it a trend.

    Let’s journey back to the Spring-Summer 2016 collection that Karl Lagerfeld designed for Chanel. The sustainable pieces were created from jute, hemp, cork, cotton, straw and even recycled paper.

    And how about Stella McCartney, the designer who banned fur, suede, leather and feathers in her collection since the establishment of her eponymous brand?

    Some less popular brands are dedicated to sustainable lifestyle; others have special lines that embrace the idea. Welcome to the next brand in our “Green brand of the week” category: 4Ocean!

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    The story of the brand began when two friends – Andrew and Alex – took a surf trip to Bali. While in Indonesia, they were really devastated by the amount of plastic that they found in the ocean. They decided to create a product which would contribute for cleaner waters. Here is how their 4Ocean bracelets were born.

    Every purchased bracelet is made from recycled materials and funds the removal of 1 pound (almost half a kilogram) of trash from the ocean and coastlines. If you’re fans of precise numbers, we have some of those for you: in less than 2 years, 4Ocean has removed 813,531 pounds (about 360 tons) of trash from the ocean!

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    June is the month of the sea turtle, so by purchasing the limited edition bracelet, not only do you help to clean the ocean from trash, but you also help sea turtles!

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    Find more information here and make sure to get your hands on the lovely piece of jewellery – we already did so in our Remix Second Hand office!

  • Green brand of the week: TOMS

    As you probably already know, during the past few years the art of Green Fashion has been so popular that we can actually call it a trend.

    Here is why we are delighted to present to you our category “Green brand of the week”. First brand on the menu: TOMS!

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    The history behind the label is more than adorable. In 2006 Blake Mycoskie, the founder of TOMS, takes a trip to Argentina. He is shocked by the many children, who cannot afford to buy shoes and therefore walk barefoot. Blake decides to act on it and his action is called TOMS shoes – a company which promises the following:

    One for one
    For each purchased pair of shoes, TOMS will give a pair to a child in need.

    The good deeds continue. In 2011, the brand launches a line of sunglasses. What is “the catch” here? The profit will be used for prescription glasses, medical treatment and eye care training for volunteers and teachers. 2015 is another important year: the label launches its collection of bags, which helps raising funds for free training for skilled birth attendants and distribution of birth kits, containing items that help a woman safely deliver her baby.

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    From 2006 until now, TOMS gave more than 60 million pairs of shoes to children in need and helped giving birth to more than 25 000 babies.

    Some designers are the living proof that fashion, charity and sustainability can go hand in hand!